Microsoft R Open 3.4.2 now available

Microsoft R Open (MRO), Microsoft’s enhanced distribution of open source R, has been upgraded to version 3.4.2 and is now available for download for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This update upgrades the R language engine to the latest R 3.4.2 and updates the bundled packages.  MRO is 100% compatible with all R packages. MRO 3.4.2 points to a fixed CRAN snapshot taken on October 15 2017, and you can see some highlights of new packages released since the prior version of MRO on the Spotlights page. As always you can use the built-in checkpoint package to access packages from an earlier date (for compatibility) or a later date (to access new and updated packages). MRO 3.4.2 is based on R 3.4.2, a minor update to the R engine (you can see the detailed list of updates to R here). This update is backwards-compatible with…
Original Post: Microsoft R Open 3.4.2 now available

Announcing dplyrXdf 1.0

I’m delighted to announce the release of version 1.0.0 of the dplyrXdf package. dplyrXdf began as a simple (relatively speaking) backend to dplyr for Microsoft Machine Learning Server/Microsoft R Server’s Xdf file format, but has now become a broader suite of tools to ease working with Xdf files. This update to dplyrXdf brings the following new features: Support for the new tidyeval framework that powers the current release of dplyr Support for Spark and Hadoop clusters, including integration with the sparklyr package to process Hive tables in Spark Integration with dplyr to process SQL Server tables in-database Simplified handling of parallel processing for grouped data Several utility functions for Xdf and file management Workarounds for various glitches and unexpected behaviour in MRS and dplyr Spark, Hadoop and HDFS New in version 1.0.0 of dplyrXdf is support for Xdf files and datasets stored…
Original Post: Announcing dplyrXdf 1.0

R 3.4.2 is released

The R Core team today announced the release of R 3.4.2. This release fixes a number of minor bugs and also includes a performance improvement to the commonly-used function c when applied to vectors with a names attribute. Like all minor releases, this release is backwards compatible with prior releases in the R 3.4.x series. Binary builds of R 3.4.2 will begin to appear on your local CRAN mirror within the next day or so. This release also marks the final Windows build of R by Duncan Murdoch, who has been volunteering his time to the R Core group for more than 15 years to build R (and its companion Rtools) for Windows. Along with the rest of the team here at Microsoft, I’d like to offer a hearty THANK YOU to Duncan for his time, effort and expertise over…
Original Post: R 3.4.2 is released

Meet the new Microsoft R Server: Microsoft ML Server 9.2

Microsoft R Server has received a new name and a major update: Microsoft ML Server 9.2 is now available. ML Server provides a scalable production platform for R — and now Python — programs. The basic idea is that a local client can push R or Python code and have it operationalized on the remote server. ML Server is also included with the Data Science Virtual Machine and HDInsight Spark clusters on Azure.  This video gives a high-level overview of the process, or you can also see details of deploying an R model or a Python model as a web service. The related Microsoft Machine Learning Services provides similar capabilities for in-database computations within SQL Server 2017 (now with Python as well as R) and (in preview) the fully-managed Azure SQL Database. ML Services also provides real-time scoring of trained models, with predictions generated…
Original Post: Meet the new Microsoft R Server: Microsoft ML Server 9.2

Microsoft R Open 3.4.1 now available

Microsoft R Open (MRO), Microsoft’s enhanced distribution of open source R, has been upgraded to version 3.4.1 and is now available for download for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This update upgrades the R language engine to R 3.4.1 and updates the bundled packages.  MRO is 100% compatible with all R packages. MRO 3.4.1 points to a fixed CRAN snapshot from September 1 2017, and you can see some highlights of new packages released since MRO 3.4.0 on the Spotlights page. As always you can use the built-in checkpoint package to access packages from an earlier date (for compatibility) or a later date (to access new and updated packages).   MRO 3.4.1 is based on R 3.4.1, a minor update to the R engine (you can see the detailed list of updates to R here. If you’ve had problems installing packages on Windows, this update does…
Original Post: Microsoft R Open 3.4.1 now available

20 years of the R Core Group

The first “official” version of R, version 1.0.0, was released on February 29, 200. But the R Project had already been underway for several years before then. Sharing this tweet, from yesterday, from R Core member Peter Dalgaard: It was twenty years ago today, Ross Ihaka got the band to play…. #rstats pic.twitter.com/msSpPz2kyA — Peter Dalgaard (@pdalgd) August 16, 2017 Twenty years ago, on August 16 1997, the R Core Group was formed. Before that date, the committers to R were the projects’ founders Ross Ihaka and Robert Gentleman, along with Luke Tierney, Heiner Schwarte and Paul Murrell. The email above was the invitation for Kurt Kornik, Peter Dalgaard and Thomas Lumley to join as well. With the sole exception of Schwarte, all of the above remain members of the R Core Group, which has since expanded to 21 members.…
Original Post: 20 years of the R Core Group

The Real World Interactive Learning Tutorial

The Real World Interactive Learning Tutorial Alekh and I have been polishin the Real World Interactive Learning tutorial for ICML 2017 on Sunday. This tutorial should be of pretty wide interest. For data scientists, we are crossing a threshold into easy use of interactive learning while for researchers interactive learning is plausibly the most important frontier of understanding. Great progress on both the theory and especially on practical systems has been made since an earlier NIPS 2013 tutorial. Please join us if you are interested
Original Post: The Real World Interactive Learning Tutorial

ICML is changing its constitution

ICML is changing its constitution Andrew McCallum has been leading an initiative to update the bylaws of IMLS, the organization which runs ICML. I expect most people aren’t interested in such details. However, the bylaws change rarely and can have an impact over a long period of time so they do have some real importance. I’d like to hear comment from anyone with a particular interest before this year’s ICML. In my opinion, the most important aspect of the bylaws is the at-large election of members of the board which is preserved. Most of the changes between the old and new versions are aimed at better defining roles, committees, etc… to leave IMLS/ICML better organized. Anyways, please comment if you have a concern or thoughts.
Original Post: ICML is changing its constitution

Take the R Consortium survey on R

Since its foundation just a little over two years ago, the R Consortium has been dedicated to providing support to the R Project and the R community. Already, the R Consortium has channeled the contributions from its corporate members to fund more than 25 projects, working groups, and community initiatives. Recently funded initiatives include a code coverage tool for R, improved connectivity between R and databases, new methods for handling spatial data, the R-hub package builder, and the SatRdays and R-Ladies community programs. (Many of these projects were presented at the recent useR!2017 conference in Brussels, which was awesome to see.) Now, the R Consortium would like to year from you, the R user community, to help guide it directions. Please take a few minutes to take the R Consortium’s Survey on R, and share your thoughts on the past, present and…
Original Post: Take the R Consortium survey on R

UseR! 2017 live-stream starts July 5

The useR!2017 conference, the annual meeting of R users worldwide and the largest to date, is sold completely sold out. But for those that couldn’t make it to Brussels, Microsoft will be live-streaming the conference at aka.ms/useRConference-live. Bookmark that page and follow along during the conference starting with the opening of the main program at 9:00 AM Brussels time (UTC+2hrs) on Wednesday, July 5.  To help you plan your viewing schedule, you can find the complete useR!2017 schedule here. (You can also find links to keynotes and presentations from my Microsoft colleagues here.) As with last year’s conference (you can watch the proceedings from useR!2016 here), the recordings of the presentations will available for on-demand viewing a couple of weeks after the conference. Also, new to this year, all of the tutorials will also be recorded (though not livestreamed). You can…
Original Post: UseR! 2017 live-stream starts July 5