Announcing OpenFermion: The Open Source Chemistry Package for Quantum Computers

Posted by Ryan Babbush and Jarrod McClean, Quantum Software Engineers, Quantum AI Team“The underlying physical laws necessary for the mathematical theory of a large part of physics and the whole of chemistry are thus completely known, and the difficulty is only that the exact application of these laws leads to equations much too complicated to be soluble.”-Paul Dirac, Quantum Mechanics of Many-Electron Systems (1929)In this passage, physicist Paul Dirac laments that while quantum mechanics accurately models all of chemistry, exactly simulating the associated equations appears intractably complicated. Not until 1982 would Richard Feynman suggest that instead of surrendering to the complexity of quantum mechanics, we might harness it as a computational resource. Hence, the original motivation for quantum computing: by operating a computer according to the laws of quantum mechanics, one could efficiently unravel exact simulations of nature. Such simulations…
Original Post: Announcing OpenFermion: The Open Source Chemistry Package for Quantum Computers

The Google Brain Team’s Approach to Research

Posted by Jeff Dean, Google Senior FellowAbout a year ago, the Google Brain team first shared our mission “Make machines intelligent. Improve people’s lives.” In that time, we’ve shared updates on our work to infuse machine learning across Google products that hundreds of millions of users access everyday, including Translate, Maps, and more. Today, I’d like to share more about how we approach this mission both through advancement in the fundamental theory and understanding of machine learning, and through research in the service of product.Five years ago, our colleagues Alfred Spector, Peter Norvig, and Slav Petrov published a blog post and paper explaining Google’s hybrid approach to research, an approach that always allowed for varied balances between curiosity-driven and application-driven research. The biggest challenges in machine learning that the Brain team is focused on require the broadest exploration of new…
Original Post: The Google Brain Team’s Approach to Research

Highlights from the Annual Google PhD Fellowship Summit, and Announcing the 2017 Google PhD Fellows

Posted by Susie Kim, Program Manager, University RelationsIn 2009, Google created the PhD Fellowship Program to recognize and support outstanding graduate students doing exceptional research in Computer Science and related disciplines. Now in its ninth year, our Fellowships have helped support over 300 graduate students in Australia, China and East Asia, India, North America, Europe and the Middle East who seek to shape and influence the future of technology.Recently, Google PhD Fellows from around the globe converged on our Mountain View campus for the second annual Global PhD Fellowship Summit. VP of Education and University Programs Maggie Johnson welcomed the Fellows and went over Google’s approach to research and its impact across our products and services. The students heard talks from researchers like Ed Chi, Douglas Eck, Úlfar Erlingsson, Dina Papagiannaki, Viren Jain, Ian Goodfellow, Kevin Murphy and Galen Andrew,…
Original Post: Highlights from the Annual Google PhD Fellowship Summit, and Announcing the 2017 Google PhD Fellows