The EARLy career scholarship

At Mango, we’re passionate about R and promoting its use in enterprise – it’s why we created the EARL Conferences. We understand the importance of sharing knowledge to generate new ideas and change the way organisations use R for the better. This year we are on a mission to actively encourage the attendance of R users who are either in a very early stage of their career or are finishing their academic studies and looking at employment options. We’re offering EARLy career R users a chance to come to EARL – we have a number of 2-day conference passes for EARL London and tickets for each 1-day event in the US. This year’s dates are:London, 12-13 SeptemberSeattle, 7 NovemberHouston, 9 NovemberBoston, 13 November Who can apply? Anyone in their first year of employment Anyone doing an internship or work placement…
Original Post: The EARLy career scholarship

Join us for some R and Data Science knowledge sharing in 2018

We’re proud to be part of the Data Science and R communities. We recognise the importance of knowledge sharing across industries, helping people with their personal and professional development, networking, and collaboration in improving and growing the community. This is why we run a number of events and participate in many others. Each year, we host and sponsor events across the UK, Europe and the US. Each event is open everyone —experienced or curious— and aims to help people share and gain knowledge about Data Science and to get them involved with the wider community. To get you started we’ve put together a list of the different our events you can attend over the next 12 months: Free community events LondonR We host LondonR in central London every two months. At each meet up we have three brilliant R presentations…
Original Post: Join us for some R and Data Science knowledge sharing in 2018

Scale up your interest: key steps for getting into data science

Owen Jones, Placement Student Prelude Maybe you’re looking for a change of scene. Maybe you’re looking for your first job. Maybe you’re stuck in conversation with a relative who you haven’t spoken to since last Christmas and who has astonishingly strong opinions on whether cells ought to be merged or not in Excel spreadsheets. The fact of the matter is that you have just encountered the term “data science” for the first time, and it sounds like it might be interesting but you don’t have a clue what it is. Something to do with computers? Should you bring a lab coat, or a VR headset? Or both? What is a data and how does one science it? Fear not. I am here to offer subjective, questionable and most importantly FREE advice from the perspective of someone who was in that…
Original Post: Scale up your interest: key steps for getting into data science

ANNOUNCEMENT: EARL US Roadshow + abstract submissions open

We’re very excited to announce a new format for the Enterprise Applications of the R Language Conference (EARL) in the US – a three-stop roadshow! We’ll be visiting three cities to get the conversation going about the commercial usage of R: Wednesday 7 November – Seattle, WA Friday 8 November – Houston, TX Tuesday 13 November – Boston, MA Why a roadshow?When we’re talking to EARL delegates, we notice a theme: people are time-poor and can’t travel far, but they prefer to attend conferences as part of their ongoing professional development. By offering three 1-day events in different States, we hope to help as many people as possible find inspiration for solving problems with R in their organisations. What is EARL?EARL is a cross-sector conference focusing on the commercial use of the R programming language. The US roadshow will feature…
Original Post: ANNOUNCEMENT: EARL US Roadshow + abstract submissions open

Field Guide to the R Ecosystem

Mark Sellors, Head of Data Engineering I started working with R around about 5 years ago. Parts of the R world have changed substantially over that time, while other parts remain largely the same. One thing that hasn’t changed however, is that there has never been a simple, high-level text to introduce newcomers to the ecosystem. I believe this is especially important now that the ecosystem has grown so much. It’s no longer enough to just know about R itself. Those working with, or even around R, must now understand the ecosystem as a whole in order to best manage and support its use. Hopefully the Field Guide to the R Ecosystem goes some way towards filling this gap. The field guide aims to provide a high level introduction to the R ecosystem. Designed for those approaching the language for…
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ANNOUNCEMENT: EARL London 2018 + abstract submissions open!

We are thrilled to announce the dates for next year’s EARL London: 11-13 September 2018 (make sure you pop these dates in your calendars!). Call for abstracts Abstract submissions are now open! We’d love to hear from you if you want to share your R story. Every year, R users from all over the world submit fantastic abstracts around really cool commercial R usage and we want you to be one of them in 2018! We’re accepting lightning talks… For 2018, we’re mixing things up and accepting abstracts for lightning talks as well as the usual 30 minute slots. These lightning talk slots are 10 minutes long, so it’s about concentrating the awesomeness of R into a bite-sized chunk. Seven reasons you should submit an abstract In case you’re ‘umming’ and ‘ahhing’, we’ve put together the top seven reasons why…
Original Post: ANNOUNCEMENT: EARL London 2018 + abstract submissions open!

When a Tweet Turns Into an R Package

Reproduced with the kind permission of our Head of Data Engineering, Mark Sellors and first published on his blog Boy, that escalated quickly I just wanted to write up a brief post about the power of R, its community, and tell the story of how actually putting stuff out into the world can have amazing consequences. About 24 hours ago I was going to tweet something like this: Hey Mac #rstats users – system(‘say “hello rstats user”’) I’d been playing with the MacOS command line tool, ‘say’, with the kids, and just figured it would be funny to make R say stuff. Before I tweeted though, I thought I’d better check that it worked as intended. While I was doing that I decided it would be fun to expose the say command’s different voices and figured I’d make a gist…
Original Post: When a Tweet Turns Into an R Package

5 ways a SAS Health Check can simplify a transition to R

Nic Crane, Data Scientist At Mango, we’re seeing more and more clients making the decision to modernise their analytics process; moving away from SAS and on to R, Python, and other technologies. There are a variety of reasons for this, including SAS license costs, the increase of recent graduates with R and Python skills, SAS becoming increasingly uncommon, or the need for flexible technologies which have the capability for advanced analytics and quality graphics output. While such transitions are typically about much more than just technology migration, the code accounts for a significant degree of the complexity. So, in order to support our clients, we have developed a software suite to analyse the existing SAS code and simplify this process. So how can a SAS Code Health Check help you decide on how to tackle this kind of transformation? 1.…
Original Post: 5 ways a SAS Health Check can simplify a transition to R

EARL Boston round up

Now we’ve recovered from over indulging in Boston’s culinary delights, we’re ready to share our highlights from this year’s EARL Boston Conference. Day 1 highlights Stack Overflow’s David Robinson kicked off the Conference, using Stack Overflow data to perform all sorts of interesting analyses. Highlights included trends in questions mentioning specific R packages over time, leading to the identification of rival R packages. We found that R is the least disliked language (because it’s the best obviously!); although David cautioned that often people who haven’t used R before haven’t heard of it either. Richie Cotton’s talk on how DataCamp is a ‘data-inspired’ organisation was particularly entertaining and he was a really engaging speaker. It was also great to hear from Emily Riederer about tidycf; she shared a really good example of the type of data-driven revolution taking place in many…
Original Post: EARL Boston round up

Putting the cat in scatterplot

Clara Schartner, Data Scientist It will come as no surprise that cats and ggplot are among our favourite things here at Mango, luckily there is an easy way to combine both. Using the function annotation_custom in the popular ggplot2 package it is possible to display images on a plot i.e. points of a scatterplot. This way data can be displayed in a more fun, creative way. In keeping with the cat theme I have chosen a data set about cats and a cat icon based on Mango the cat. The MASS package provides a data set called cats which contains the body weight, heart weight and sex of adult cats. library(MASS) data(cats) head(cats) set.seed(1234) cats <- cats[sample(1:144, size = 40),] First a normal scatterplot is defined on which the images will be plotted later: library(ggplot2) sCATter <-ggplot(data = cats, aes(x…
Original Post: Putting the cat in scatterplot