Is it wine o’clock?

Emojis were again quite en vogue this week on Twitter with Romain François doing some awesome stuff for the emo package, in particular this teeny tiny animated clock. It reminded me of my own emoji animated clock that I had done a while ago for representing time-use data. Time for me to present its genesis! I’m actually not a Quantified Self person, but at my work time-use data was collected for an epidemiology project: information about people activities and locations throughout one day can help unraveling sources of exposure to air pollution. I’ve therefore spent some time thinking about how to represent such data. In particular, my colleague Margaux directed a fantastic video about our project. We introduced some real data from our project in it, including an animated clock that I made with emoji-coding of indoor-outdoor location. I’ll present…
Original Post: Is it wine o’clock?

Pets or livestock? Naming your RMarkdown chunks

Today I made a confession on Twitter: I told the world I had spent my whole career not naming chunks in RMarkdown documents. Even if I had said one should name them when teaching RMarkdown. But it was also a tweet for showing off since I was working on the first manuscript with named chunks and loving it. I got some interesting reactions to my tweet, including one that made me feel better about myself (sorry Thomas), and other ones that made me feel like phrasing why one should name RMarkdown chunks. Hadley Wickham asked whether chunks were pets or livestock, as in his analogy for models. Livestock chunks are identified by numbers, not names, in the case of chunks defined by position. I now think we have good reason to consider them as pets and here’s why… My fur…
Original Post: Pets or livestock? Naming your RMarkdown chunks

Who are the Swedish radio P1 summer guests? Answer via Wikidata

This week, a very promising new R blog was launched, namely the blog of Eric Persson a.k.a as expersso on Twitter. I had really been looking forward to this because expersso’s code screenshots have always been quite cool, so seeing his no longer being limited to them is awesome! His first articles series is about a game, you should really check it out. (PSA: if you post screenshots of R code on Twitter, have a look at Sean Kross’ codefinch package!). Because I’m a nosy person I asked Eric whether he was Swedish, his last name being quite Swedish-looking in my opinion. He is, which made me wonder about Swedish blog topics and actually decided to use one Swedish topic I came up with, the summer guests of the Swedish radio P1! Every summer since 1959, P1 selects a bunch…
Original Post: Who are the Swedish radio P1 summer guests? Answer via Wikidata

What’s in our internal chaimagic package at work

At my day job I’m a data manager and statistician for an epidemiology project called CHAI lead by Cathryn Tonne. CHAI means “Cardio-vascular health effects of air pollution in Telangana, India” and you can find more about it in our recently published protocol paper . At my institute you could also find the PASTA and TAPAS projects so apparently epidemiologists are good at naming things, or obsessed with food… But back to CHAI! This week Sean Lopp from RStudio wrote an interesting blog post about internal packages. I liked reading it and feeling good because we do have an internal R package for CHAI! In this blog post, I’ll explain what’s in there, in the hope of maybe providing inspiration for your own internal package! As posted in this tweet, this pic represents the Barcelona contingent of CHAI, a…
Original Post: What’s in our internal chaimagic package at work

How I became a crolute i.e. an user of the crul package

A few months ago rOpenSci’s Scott Chamberlain asked me for feedback about a new package of his called crul, an http client like httr, so basically something you use for e.g. writing a package interfacing an API. He told me that a great thing about crul was that it supports asynchronous requests. I felt utterly uncool because I had no idea what this meant although I had already written quite a few API packages (for instance ropenaq, riem and opencage). So I googled the concept, my mind was blown and I decided that I’d trust Scott’s skills (spoiler: you can always do that) and just replace the httrdependency of ropenaq by crul. Why? First of all note that Crul is a planet in Star Wars whose male inhabitants are called crolutes which sound quite cool (there are female ones…
Original Post: How I became a crolute i.e. an user of the crul package

Automatic tools for improving R packages

On Tuesday I gave a talk at a meetup of the R users group of Barcelona. I got to choose the topic of my talk, and decided I’d like to expand a bit on a recent tweet of mine. There are tools that help you improve your R packages, some of them are not famous enough yet in my opinion, so I was happy to help spread the word! I published my slides online but thought that a blog post would be nice as well. During my talk at RUG BCN, for each tool I gave a short introduction and then applied it to a small package I had created for the occasion. In that post I’ll just shortly present each tool. Most of them are only automatic because they automatically provide you with a list of things to…
Original Post: Automatic tools for improving R packages

Who is talking about the French Open?

I don’t think rOpenSci’s Jeroen Ooms can ever top the coolness of his magick package but I have to admit other things he’s developped are not bad at all. He’s recently been working on interfaces to Google compact language detectors 2 and 3 (the latter being more experimental). I saw this cool use case and started thinking about other possible applications of the packages.I was very sad when I realized it was too late to try and download tweets about the Eurovision song context but then I also remembered there’s this famous tennis tournament going on right now, about which people probably tweet in various languages. I don’t follow the French Open myself, but it seemed interesting to find out which languages were the most prevalent, and whether the results from the cld2 and cld3 packages are similar and whether…
Original Post: Who is talking about the French Open?

Which science is all around? #BillMeetScienceTwitter

I’ll admit I didn’t really know who Bill Nye was before yesterday. His name sounds a bit like Bill Nighy’s, that’s all I knew. But well science is all around and quite often scientists on Twitter start interesting campaigns. Remember the #actuallylivingscientists whose animals I dedicated a blog post? This time, the Twitter campaign is the #BillMeetScienceTwitter hashtag with which scientists introduce themselves to the famous science TV host Bill Nye. Here is a nice article about the movement. Since I like surfing on Twitter trends, I decided to download a few of these tweets and to use my own R interface to the Monkeylearn machine learning API, monkeylearn (part of the rOpenSci project!), to classify the tweets in the hope of finding the most represented science fields. So, which science is all around? It might sound a bit like…
Original Post: Which science is all around? #BillMeetScienceTwitter