From Data to Viz | Find the graphic you need

I’m delighted to announce a new dataviz project called ‘Data to Viz’. —> data-to-viz.com What it is From Data to Viz is a classification of chart types based on input data format. It comes in the form of a decision tree leading to a set of potentially appropriate visualizations to represent the dataset. The decision trees are available in a poster that has been presented at UseR in Brisbane. Philosophie The project is built on two underlying philosophies. First, that most data analysis can be summarized in about twenty different dataset formats. Second, that both data and context determine the appropriate chart. Thus, our suggested method consists in identifying and trying all feasible chart types to find out which suits your data and idea best. Once this set of graphic identified, data-to-viz.com aims to guide you toward the best decision. Content…
Original Post: From Data to Viz | Find the graphic you need

A smooth transition between chloropleth and cartogram

[…] Related R-bloggers.com offers daily e-mail updates about R news and tutorials on topics such as: Data science, Big Data, R jobs, visualization (ggplot2, Boxplots, maps, animation), programming (RStudio, Sweave, LaTeX, SQL, Eclipse, git, hadoop, Web Scraping) statistics (regression, PCA, time series, trading) and more… If you got this far, why not subscribe for updates from the site? Choose your flavor: e-mail, twitter, RSS, or facebook…
Original Post: A smooth transition between chloropleth and cartogram

How to draw connecting routes on map with R and great circles

This post explains how to draw connection lines between several localizations on a map, using R. The method proposed here relies on the use of the gcIntermediate function from the geosphere package. Instead of making straight lines, it offers to draw the shortest routes, using great circles. A special care is given for situations where cities are very far from each other and where the shortest connection thus passes behind the map. First we need to load 3 libraries. Maps allows to draw the background map, and geosphere provides the gcintermediate function. library(tidyverse) library(maps) library(geosphere) 1- Draw an empty map This is easily done using the ‘maps’ package. You can see plenty of other maps made with R in the map section of the R graph gallery. par(mar=c(0,0,0,0)) map(‘world’,col=”#f2f2f2″, fill=TRUE, bg=”white”, lwd=0.05,mar=rep(0,4),border=0, ylim=c(-80,80) ) 2- Add 3 cities First…
Original Post: How to draw connecting routes on map with R and great circles

Get the best from ggplotly

Plotly is an R library allowing to make amazing interactive charts in a minute. This blog post shows how to get the best from ggplotly, the function of plotly allowing you to turn any ggplot2 chart interactive. A special care is given on features that are not present in ggplot2 (like hovering), and features that are not well translated by ggplotly (like legend position). Let’s start with a usual ggplot2 chart. Note that the ggplot2 section of the R graph gallery contains dozens of examples with the reproducible code, so you will most likely find the graphic you need to visualize your data. # Libraries library(tidyverse) library(plotly) # Scatterplot p=ggplot(iris, aes(x=Sepal.Length, y=Sepal.Width, color=Species, shape=Species)) + geom_point(size=6, alpha=0.6) p Then, we can apply the magic of plotly in just one line of code! We get an interactive chart…
Original Post: Get the best from ggplotly

The Genetic Map Comparator: a user-friendly application to display and compare genetic maps

The Genetic Map Comparator is an R Shiny application made to compare and characterize genetic maps. You can use it through the online version and read the related publication in Bioinformatics. The biological perspective A genetic map provides the position of genetic markers along chromosomes. Geneticists often have to visualize these maps and calculate their basic statistics (length, # of markers, gap size..). Multiple maps that share some markers have to be dealt with when several segregating populations are studied. These maps are compared to highlight their overall relative strengths and weaknesses (e.g. via marker distributions or map lengths), or local marker inconsistencies. The Genetic Map Comparator is an effective user-friendly tool to complete these tasks. It is possible to upload your genetic maps and explore them using the various sheets accessible via links at the top of the…
Original Post: The Genetic Map Comparator: a user-friendly application to display and compare genetic maps