RStudio Connect v1.5.10

We’re pleased to announce version 1.5.10 of RStudio Connect and the general availability of RStudio Connect Execution Servers. Execution Servers enable horizontal scaling and high availability for all the content you develop in R. The 1.5.10 release also includes important security improvements and bug fixes. RStudio Connect Execution Servers Support for high availability and horizontal scaling is now generally available through RStudio Connect Execution Servers. Execution Servers enable RStudio Connect to run across a multi-node cluster. Today, Execution Servers act as identically configured Connect instances. Requests for Shiny applications and Plumber APIs are split across nodes by a load balancer. Scheduled R Markdown execution is distributed across the cluster through an internal job scheduler that distributes work evenly across nodes. Over time, more of Connect’s work will be handled by the internal scheduler, giving admins control over what nodes accomplish…
Original Post: RStudio Connect v1.5.10

Birds of a Feather sessions at rstudio::conf 2018 and the rstudio::conf app!

RStudio appreciates the hundreds of smart, passionate, data science enthusiasts who have already registered for rstudio::conf 2018. We’re looking forward to a fantastic conference, immersing in all things R & RStudio. If you haven’t registered yet, please do! Some workshops are now full. We are also over 90% of our registration target – with more than 2 months to go. It’s safe to say we will sell out. The sooner you are able to register, the better. It’s going to be an amazing time! REGISTER TODAY For those who have registered, we’d like to help you connect with others doing similar work. Attendees include many kinds of professionals in physical, natural, social and data sciences, statistics, education, engineering, research, BI, IT data infrastructure, finance, marketing, customer support, operations, human resources…and many more. They are sole proprietors and work for the…
Original Post: Birds of a Feather sessions at rstudio::conf 2018 and the rstudio::conf app!

R in Africa

R is used around the world and yet, in English-speaking media at least, we tendto hear most about what is happening in North America, Europe, and Australasia.So we would like to highlight some recent initiatives in the Rcommunity from other regions of the world, with this first post in the seriesfocusing on R in Africa. satRdays in Cape Town Following the first successfulsatRday in Budapest on 3 September 2016, asatRday in Cape Town was held on18 February 2017. The event was hosted atWorkshop 17 in the Victoria & Alfred Waterfront.There were three great keynote speakers(Jenny Bryan,Julia Silge andSteph Locke). In addition to the invitedspeakers the organizers received 41 contributed proposals, of which 23 wereaccepted: 3 tutorials, 8 standard talks and 12 lightning talks. Just over 200tickets were issued for the event and the venue was literally packed. On twodays prior…
Original Post: R in Africa

The Value of Welcome, part 2: How to prepare 40 new community members for an unconference

I’ve raved about the value of extending a personalized welcome to new community members and I recently shared six tips for running a successful hackathon-flavoured unconference. Building on these, I’d like to share the specific approach and (free!) tools I used to help prepare new rOpenSci community members to be productive at our unconference. My approach was inspired directly by my AAAS Community Engagement Fellowship Program (AAAS-CEFP) training. Specifically, 1) one mentor said that the most successful conference they ever ran involved having one-to-one meetings with all participants prior to the event, and 2) prior to our in-person AAAS-CEFP training, we completed an intake questionnaire that forced us to consider things like “what do you hope to get out of this” and “what do you hope to contribute”. A challenge of this year’s unconference was the fact that we were…
Original Post: The Value of Welcome, part 2: How to prepare 40 new community members for an unconference

Understanding Bias in Peer Review

Posted by Andrew Tomkins, Director of Engineering and William D. Heavlin, Statistician, Google ResearchIn the 1600’s, a series of practices came into being known collectively as the “scientific method.” These practices encoded verifiable experimentation as a path to establishing scientific fact. Scientific literature arose as a mechanism to validate and disseminate findings, and standards of scientific peer review developed as a means to control the quality of entrants into this literature. Over the course of development of peer review, one key structural question remains unresolved to the current day: should the reviewers of a piece of scientific work be made aware of the identify of the authors? Those in favor argue that such additional knowledge may allow the reviewer to set the work in perspective and evaluate it more completely. Those opposed argue instead that the reviewer may form an…
Original Post: Understanding Bias in Peer Review

Understanding Bias in Peer Review

Posted by Andrew Tomkins, Director of Engineering and William D. Heavlin, Statistician, Google ResearchIn the 1600’s, a series of practices came into being known collectively as the “scientific method.” These practices encoded verifiable experimentation as a path to establishing scientific fact. Scientific literature arose as a mechanism to validate and disseminate findings, and standards of scientific peer review developed as a means to control the quality of entrants into this literature. Over the course of development of peer review, one key structural question remains unresolved to the current day: should the reviewers of a piece of scientific work be made aware of the identify of the authors? Those in favor argue that such additional knowledge may allow the reviewer to set the work in perspective and evaluate it more completely. Those opposed argue instead that the reviewer may form an…
Original Post: Understanding Bias in Peer Review

Mega-PAW: Largest Predictive Analytics World, Las Vegas, June 2018 – Super Early Bird Discount until Dec 22

[unable to retrieve full-text content]In June 2018, Las Vegas will host the largest Predictive Analytics World ever, with PAW Business, Financial, Healthcare, and Manufacturing, and Deep Learning World. Get SEB discount till Dec 22.
Original Post: Mega-PAW: Largest Predictive Analytics World, Las Vegas, June 2018 – Super Early Bird Discount until Dec 22

Visualising SSH attacks with R

If you have any machine with an SSH server open to the world and you take a look at your logs, you may be alarmed to see so many login attempts from so many unknown IP addresses. DenyHosts is a pretty neat service for Unix-based systems which works in the background reviewing such logs and appending the offending addresses into the hosts.deny file, thus avoiding brute-force attacks. The following R snippet may be useful to quickly visualise a hosts.deny file with logs from DenyHosts. Such file may have comments (lines starting with #), and actual records are stored in the form : . Therefore, read.table is more than enough to load it into R. The rgeolocate package is used to geolocate the IPs, and the counts per country are represented in a world map using rworldmap: library(dplyr) library(rgeolocate) library(rworldmap) hosts.deny <- “/etc/hosts.deny” db <- system.file(“extdata”, “GeoLite2-Country.mmdb”, package=”rgeolocate”) read.table(hosts.deny, col.names=c(“service”, “IP”)) %>% pull(IP) %>%…
Original Post: Visualising SSH attacks with R

R 3.4.3 released

R 3.4.3 has been released, as announced by the R Core team today. As of this writing, only the source distribution (for those that build R themselves) is available, but binaries for Windows, Mac and Linux should appear on your local CRAN mirror within the next day or so. This is primarily a bug-fix release. It fixes an issue with incorrect time zones on MacOS High Sierra, and some issues with handling Unicode characters. (Incidentally, representing international and special characters is something that R takes great care in handling properly. It’s not an easy task: a 2003 essay by Joel Spolsky describes the minefield that is character representation, and not much has changed since then.) You can check out the complete list of changes here. Whatever your platform, R 3.4.3 should be backwards-compatible will other R versions in the R…
Original Post: R 3.4.3 released

R 3.4.3 released

R 3.4.3 has been released, as announced by the R Core team today. As of this writing, only the source distribution (for those that build R themselves) is available, but binaries for Windows, Mac and Linux should appear on your local CRAN mirror within the next day or so. This is primarily a bug-fix release. It fixes an issue with incorrect time zones on MacOS High Sierra, and some issues with handling Unicode characters. (Incidentally, representing international and special characters is something that R takes great care in handling properly. It’s not an easy task: a 2003 essay by Joel Spolsky describes the minefield that is character representation, and not much has changed since then.) You can check out the complete list of changes here. Whatever your platform, R 3.4.3 should be backwards-compatible will other R versions in the R…
Original Post: R 3.4.3 released