“Why researchers keep citing retracted papers”

chris says: Drury, that’s an interesting take but not sure the citation system is past its sell-by date yet! I would say that the primary purpose(s) of the current system are still to justify statements made in one’s paper that relate to prior work and its interpretation, and to provide reference to methodologies employed that the reader might be interested…
Original post: “Why researchers keep citing retracted papers”
Source: Andrew Gelman

How Big Data and Predictive Analytics can help manage climate change

           Tweet Previous post Next post Tags: Big Data, Climate Change, Kaushik Pal We review how Big data and data science can provide accurate analytics to help deal with climate change with tools like Global Forest Watch, Microsoft Research’s Madingley Model, and the Google Earth Engine. By Kaushik Pal, Techalpine. Climate change has been attracting a lot of attention for…
Original post: How Big Data and Predictive Analytics can help manage climate change
Source: KDnuggets

The R Project: 2015 in Review

It’s been a banner year for the R project in 2015, with frequent new releases, ever-growing popularity, a flourishing ecosystem, and accolades from both users and press. Here’s a roundup of the big events for R from 2015.  R continues to advance under the  new leadership of the R Foundation. There were five updates in 2015: R 3.1.3 in March, R 3.2.0 in April, R…
Original post: The R Project: 2015 in Review
Source: Revolutions

2016: The Year of Hadooplooza

           Tweet Previous post Next post Tags: 2016 Predictions, Bruno Aziza, Data Lakes, Hadoop Bruno Aziza examines the Hadoopalooza effect, how to avoid poor decisions to come back from the party a “Hadoop-loser”, and what is needed to get value from data lakes. By Bruno Aziza, CMO of AtScale.I’m sure you’re familiar with the term “Palooza”: an all-out…
Original post: 2016: The Year of Hadooplooza
Source: KDnuggets

Top posts of 2015

What to think about in 2015: How can the principles of statistical quality control be applied to statistics education Stethoscope as weapon of mass distraction “Why continue to teach and use hypothesis testing?” Relaxed plagiarism standards as a way to keep the tuition dollars flowing from foreign students What to do in 2015: Your statistics diary “Life Paths and Accomplishments…
Original post: Top posts of 2015
Source: Andrew Gelman

Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV

Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV Posted by Andrew on 30 December 2015, 6:05 pm Paul Alper points us to this in-depth article by Steven Brill on the topic of Alex Gorsky, the pharma executive who notoriously marketed a dangerous drug and hid the evidence of its dangers. The headline was a bit of a cheat, though. The story…
Original post: Definitely got nothing to do with chess IV
Source: Andrew Gelman

Using segmented regression to analyse world record running times

You can immediately see that the speed declines very rapidly from the sprint events. Perhaps it would be better to plot this using a logarithmic x-scale, adding some labels at the same time. I also added some colour for what I call standard events – where “standard” is the type of distance you would see regularly at a world championships…
Original post: Using segmented regression to analyse world record running times
Source: Revolutions

TensorFlow is Terrific – A Sober Take on Deep Learning Acceleration

           Tweet Previous post Next post Tags: Deep Learning, Facebook, Google, Machine Learning, TensorFlow, Torch, Zachary Lipton TensorFlow does not change the world. But it appears to be the best, most convenient deep learning library out there. comments By Zachary Chase Lipton On November 9th, Google open-sourced TensorFlow, a Python library for performing fast gradient-based machine learning on…
Original post: TensorFlow is Terrific – A Sober Take on Deep Learning Acceleration
Source: KDnuggets

Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place

Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place Posted by Andrew on 30 December 2015, 9:22 am From the Stan users list: I have just started to look into the output of the optimizing function and it seems to give estimates slightly different than the ones that I had previously obtained through maximum likelihood estimation (using MATLAB).…
Original post: Showdown in Vegas: When the numbers differ in the third decimal place
Source: Andrew Gelman

Creating multi-tab reports with R and jQuery UI

by Matt Parker, Data Scientist at Microsoft One of the great advantages of R’s openness is its extensibility. R’s abundant packages are the most conspicuous example of that extensibility, and Revolution R Enterprise is a powerful example of how far it can stretch. But R is also part of an entire ecosystem of open tools that can be linked together.…
Original post: Creating multi-tab reports with R and jQuery UI
Source: Revolutions